Geraldine Farmer’s Market exhibitors brave the wet weather

A 10-year-old girl’s Saturday morning efforts at the Geraldine Farmer’s Market should deliver a “big surprise” to the SPCA.

Etin Beersten, who braved the wet conditions over the weekend, collected all proceeds from the sale of potted plants in an envelope for the animal welfare charity, his mother, Carlien Bolder, said.

“She does everything herself,” Bolder said.

“It’s an idea she had two or three months ago. She thought it would be a good idea to sell some plants at the market and also donate to the SPCA.

“Some of her friends come over to help her sometimes and Anya (Johnston) helps her sometimes.”

Longtime Geraldine resident George Rate, 88, also appreciated the market.

“There’s always something going on,” Rate said.

George Rate, an 88-year-old resident of Geraldine, was not going to let the rain stop him from visiting the market.

JOHN BISSET / Stuff

George Rate, an 88-year-old resident of Geraldine, was not going to let the rain stop him from visiting the market.

“The rain wasn’t going to stop me. I just put the roof on the scooter and sit under it. When you live alone, the company is important and the market is a good company.

“It’s always nice to go, have a good thread and keep going.”

While the wet weather did not prevent the market from happening on Saturday, a few clothing stalls had to be closed.

Market President Kit Silcock said there would typically be 12-14 stalls at the Talbot Street Market.

“All the food and plant stalls were still open,” said Silcock.

“We are every Saturday from October to Easter. We have very good support from local residents and residents of the surrounding neighborhoods.

“I think Geraldine is a great destination for people coming from Ashburton, Dunedin and Christchurch. They usually meet here for a coffee.

Pictured are Market President Kit Silcock and Geraldine's Karyl Minnear on Saturday morning.

JOHN BISSET / Stuff

Pictured are Market President Kit Silcock and Geraldine’s Karyl Minnear on Saturday morning.

“The market is on the grounds of the church. People can come to the market and visit the church. It gives the market a bit of importance and the Anglican Church has been very kind to us.

“We had strawberries, seasonal fruits, fresh vegetables, grapes and good food. We follow the rules [traffic light rules] best possible with the scan and the 2 meter rules.

Silcock said they have 2 Christmas-themed twilight markets scheduled for December 23 and 30 from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. which he says will be “massive.”

“There’s going to be Christmas carols, Christmas type stuff, we’ll have a stall selling Christmas lilies, food, and craft stalls.”

The wet weather did not prevent Geraldine’s farmer’s market from taking place on Saturday morning, although a few clothing stalls had to be closed.

Market President Kit Silcock said there would typically be 12-14 stalls at the Talbot Street Market each week.

“All the food and plant stalls were still open,” said Silcock.

“We are every Saturday from October to Easter. We have very good support from local residents and residents of the surrounding neighborhoods.

“I think Geraldine is a great destination for people coming from Ashburton, Dunedin and Christchurch. They usually meet here for a coffee.

“The market is on the grounds of the church. People can come to the market and visit the church. It gives the market a bit of importance and the Anglican Church has been very kind to us.

“We had strawberries, seasonal fruits, fresh vegetables, grapes and good food. We follow the rules [traffic light rules] best possible with the scan and the 2 meter rules.

Silcock said they have 2 Christmas-themed twilight markets scheduled for December 23 and 30 from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. which he says will be “massive.”

“There’s going to be Christmas carols, Christmas type stuff, we’ll have a stall selling Christmas lilies, food, and craft stalls.”

George Rate, a longtime resident of Geraldine, 88, said the market is good company and he loves going to the market because there is always something new.

“There’s always something going on,” Rate said.

“The rain wasn’t going to stop me. I just put the roof on the scooter and sit under it. When you live alone, the company is important and the market is a good company.

“It’s always nice to go, have a good thread and keep going.”

Anya Johnston, 12, and Etin Beertsen, 10, are regulars in the market this year and have a booth selling potted plants to raise money for the SPCA.

Etin’s mother, Carlien Bolder, said Etin had collected all of the proceeds from the sales in an envelope and would have a “big surprise” for the SPCA when the deal ended.

“She does everything herself,” Bolder said.

“It’s an idea she had two or three months ago. She thought it would be a good idea to sell some plants at the market and also donate to the SPCA.

“Some of her friends come over to help her sometimes and Anya helps her sometimes.”

About Glenda Wait

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